The Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI)

TF-CBT Cohort 14

The Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI)* is a brief screening questionnaire used to assess adult self-report of psychological problems.  Domains assessed include somatization, depression, and anxiety symptoms.

Descriptive Statistics:  Pre- and post-treatment assessment measure means, standard deviations, and standard errors for each subscale of the BSI are listed in the table below, as well as the range of possible scores and clinically significant range for each subscale.

BSI Subscales: Descriptive Statistics

*Note: Scores are clinically significant if (1) Global Severity ≥ 63; or (2) two or more subscales (somatization, depression, and/or anxiety) ≥ 63.

Repeated Measures Analyses:  Paired samples t-tests were conducted to examine pre-post group mean differences on BSI subscales and total difficulties scores.  Analyses showed statistically significant improvement in all domains: BSI Global Severity and all three subscales.

BSI Subscales: Paired Sample t-tests

BSI Subscales and Total Scores: Pre-post Treatment Mean Scores

*** p < .001

Individual Clinically-Significant Change:  At pre-treatment, 55 TF-CBT clients had BSI Global Severity scores (caregiver self-report) at or above the clinical cut-off score of 63. Of note, 28 caregivers were missing post-treatment data for the Global Severity scale. Analysis of the caregivers with post-treatment data showed that BSI Global Severity scores for 18 of these 27 caregivers (67%) decreased to non-clinically significant levels at post-treatment.

For BSI subscales, there were 47, 45, and 60 caregivers, respectively, with pre-treatment BSI Somatization, Depression, and Anxiety scores at or above the clinical cut-off score of 63. Of note, there were missing post-treatment data for 25, 21, and 26 caregiver(s), respectively, on each of these subscales. Analyses of the caregivers with post-treatment data indicated that there were 11 of 22 (50%), 16 of 24 (67%), and 27 of 34 (79%), respectively, with BSI Somatization, Depression, and Anxiety scores that decreased to non-clinically significant levels at post-treatment.

*Derogatis, L. R. (2001). Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI)-18: Administration, scoring and procedures manual. Minneapolis, MN: NCS Pearson. http://www.pearsonclinical.com/psychology/products/100000638/brief-symptom-inventory-18-bsi-18.html

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